West Durham Railtour

Peppercorn K1 62059 (of 51A Darlington) makes its way tender-first through an unknown station on the SLS/MLS West Durham Railtour on 31st August 1958.

Peppercorn K1 62059 (of 51A Darlington) makes its way tender-first through an unknown station on the SLS/MLS West Durham Railtour on 31st August 1958.

The SLS/MLS West Durham Railtour

Peppercorn K1 62059 is seen tender first at an unknown location (for which I need help) somewhere in County Durham on 31st August 1958. The railtour was operated by the Stephenson and Manchester Locomotive Societies, starting from Manchester Exchange and hauled by rebuilt Scot 46143 ‘The South Staffordshire Regiment’. The photograph seen here was taken by Ronnie Gee, but there are no notes as to where it was taken. To aid anybody who can help the wonderful Six Bells Junction website throws some light on the route, from which somebody may identify the station and junction.

It lies somewhere along the following route:

Baxter Wood No.2 Jn – Dearness Valley Jn – Waterhouses – Waterhouses Goods, or

Scotswood – Scotswood Bridge Jn – Blaydon Main Jn – Consett Branch Jn – Dunston-on-Tyne – Low Fell Jn

If my reading of the route is incorrect and I have incorrectly calculated which part of the route was run tender-first it might possibly be along this route too:

Waterhouses Goods – Waterhouses – Dearness Valley Jn – Baxter Wood No.2 Jn – Baxter Wood No.1 Jn – Lanchester – Consett North Jn – Blackhill – Ebchester – Lintz Green – Swalwell North Jn – Blaydon South Jn – Scotswood Bridge Jn – Scotswood

I would be most grateful if anybody can help identify the location.

The railtour had brought a rebuilt Scot up the East Coast Main Line from York to Darlington Bank Top station, and by all accounts the journey both ways along the Plain of York proved to be a fast one with speeds of 82 mph being recorded each way. Whilst this may not be up to par with the regular ex-LNER pacific, the ex-LMS 7P proved it could handle an 11-coach, 330 ton train on the ECML. According to some who talked to the pilot on arrival back at York, the top speed would have been higher but the locomotive began to roll after Northallerton and it was deemed prudent not to push things further. This was a fault with the rebuilt Scots at the time; does anybody know if it was fixed?

If you can identify the location please comment below.

 

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